Hong Kong

Hong Kong is an exquisite harmony of old and new. Its modern exterior is characterised by its rapidly paced cosmopolitan life and is beautifully balanced with pockets of Chinese tradition that crop up around every corner. 

The fascinating islands and neighborhoods are singing out to be explored and each and every one offers something spectacular. Whether you’re taking a wander through the urban space gazing up at the skyscraper giants, foraging through the vibrant markets or devouring delicious street delicacies, you’ll feel truly excited by Hong Kong.

Victoria Peak.

A city view from Victoria Peak.
A city view from Victoria Peak.

At 552m high, Victoria Peak is Hong Kong Island’s highest point and it offers a breath-taking view. The peak is certainly up there as one of the most popular spots in Hong Kong for tourists who wish to look over the stunning metropolis or perhaps wander through the surrounding woods. To reach the peak, hop on the  125-year-old Peak Tram that is often dubbed ‘gravity defying’ as it creeps up the hill at an almost vertical angle.

The Peak Tram.
The Peak Tram.

Admire the views through these Chloe Carlina sunglasses for women or Ray-Ban® double bridge round sunglasses for men.

Coloured Carlina Round Sunglasses in Gold by Chloe
Coloured Carlina Round Sunglasses in Gold by Chloe.
Double Bridge Metal Round Sunglasses in Black on Silver by Ray-Ban®.
Double Bridge Metal Round Sunglasses in Black on Silver by Ray-Ban®.

Man Mo Temple.

man-mo-temple

The interesting Man Mo Temple is dedicated to the god of literature ‘Man’ and the god of war ‘Mo.’ A smokey haze defines the temple and is created by the rows of earth-coloured spirals that hang from the ceiling. The spirals are incense and are burned as offerings to the gods. As you’re exploring look out for the intricately carved sedan chairs that were used to carry Man and Mo during festivals.

Star Ferry.

Star Ferry in Victoria Harbour.
Star Ferry in Victoria Harbour.

One of the most pleasing things to do in Hong Kong is hop on the Star Ferry and experience a glimpse of heritage as well as getting a bargain sightseeing tour. Costing only HK $2.50 and offering a view of the city skyscrapers and the glorious mountains surrounding, it really is a brilliant way to explore the city with a breath of fresh sea air.

HSBC Building.

The HSBC building Hong Kong.
The HSBC building Hong Kong.

Not a typical building you’d see on sightseeing lists but the amazing HSBC headquarters is a sophisticated architectural masterpiece. Architect Sir Norman Foster designed the innovative building and when it finished in 1985 it was the worlds most expensive building costing over US $1 Billion. The lighting displayed on the exterior of the building is a grand enough sight but if you feel captivated to explore further then head inside and take the escalator up to the 3rd floor. Here you’ll find an atrium beautifully filled with natural light.

Hong Kong Park.

Hong Kong Park.
Hong Kong Park.

If you’re looking for a natural idyll then look elsewhere because Hong Kong Park is anything but that. Artificial creations fill the park including a conservatory, a viewing tower, a taichi garden and fountain plaza. The park’s Aviary is certainly worth exploring as it houses more than 600 birds of vibrant colours and appearances. The park is overlooked by a wall of high-rises and this makes for a beautifully aesthetic contrast.

Temple Street Night Market.

Temple Street Market.
Temple Street Market.

A wonderful bustling atmosphere makes the Temple Street Night Market really inviting. The stalls sell anything from antiques, more often than not fake antiques, cheap clothes, jewelry, art and watches. But the best thing to do here is eat from the dai pai dong, meaning food stalls. Mouth-watering smells drift along the street from the chinese dishes of curry, seafood, soups and snacks.

Hong Kong Museum of History.

A temple display in the Hong Kong Museum of History.
A temple display in the Hong Kong Museum of History.

Some 400 million years of the cities history has been quite remarkably squashed into this museum. The ‘Hong Kong Story’ takes you through the city’s past and as you wander through the galleries the history unfolds through lots of interesting mediums. There’s replicas of the streets, traditional costumes, a tram, film footage, interviews and a wonderful sense of the Chinese heritage is key to this museum. It’s a fantastic way to spend an afternoon, or even a day if you have long enough.

Tsim Sha Tsui.

Harbour City.
Harbour City.

For shopping, Tsim Sha Tsui is the neighborhood to be. There are trinket shops galore as well as enormous modern shopping malls where you can splash your cash. Harbour City shopping mall is colossal and hosts over 700 shops, 50 food places and 5 cinemas!

These extremely cute Miu Miu heart sunglasses are perfect for exploring the modern spots of the city.

Heart Lens Round Sunglasses in Lilac Pink by Miu Miu.
Heart Lens Round Sunglasses in Lilac Pink by Miu Miu.

Soho.

Soho escalator.
Soho escalator.

Soho is the really modern hub of the city.It offers an array of international restaurants, health-food cafes and gyms as well as interesting shops. Since the hills of this area are so large there is a street escalator running through it so hop on and enjoy the ride.

 

Eating.

Hong Kong being one of the food capitals of the world means you’ll spend your trip munching on divine food. The delicacies of China are on offer from the Cantonese, Shanhainese, Northern and Sichuanese. If you’re on a budget then it really won’t affect your standard of food because the market stalls offer food to die for. Having said that, if you do have a chance to try a higher end restaurant then be adventurous and try something new it’ll certainly surprise you.

Must Try’s:

Dim Sum- Cantonese small bites served in bamboo baskets.

Dim Sum.
Dim Sum.

Roast Goose- Cut into small pieces with a crispy skin and served with a delicious plum sauce.

Roast Goose and Chickens.
Roast Goose and Chickens.

Sweet and Sour Pork- Featuring on Chinese menus world-wide, where better to try this classic dish than in its home.

Thousand Year Eggs-  Don’t worry, the name is misleading. The eggs are actually soaked for only a few weeks or months. Duck, quail or chicken eggs are used and the yolk is an unusual creamy texture. The eggs are often served with pickled ginger root.

 

What would you love to do in Hong Kong? Let us know in the comments below.